Last week in Montreal NVIDIA renewed its commitment: “The Way It’s Meant To Be Played” to gaming and technology press from around the globe at Editors Day.  As well as highlighting unique content in the season’s best games and a new top of the line graphics card, three exciting new technologies were unveiled: G-SYNC, GameStream and ShadowPlay.

 

G-SYNC

G-SYNC allows games to update the monitor when they want rather than waiting for a predefined V-SYNC.  This allows games to run more smoothly with less latency and no tearing.  It is a huge breakthrough for PC gaming and industry luminaries, John Carmack, Johan Andersson and Tim Sweeney were on stage to share their thoughts on the new system.

Tim Sweeney, creator of Epic’s industry-dominating Unreal Engine, called G-SYNC “the biggest leap forward in gaming monitors since we went from standard definition to high-def.” He added, “If you care about gaming, G-SYNC is going to make a huge difference in the experience.” The legendary John Carmack, architect of id Software’s engine, was similarly excited, saying “Once you play on a G-SYNC capable monitor, you’ll never go back.” Coming from a pioneer of the gaming industry, who’s also a bonafide rocket scientist, that’s high praise indeed.

Tim and John are established game-engine gurus; fast approaching that status is Johan Andersson, DICE’s technical director, and architect of the Frostbite engines that power several EA titles. As a man known for pushing the boundaries of technology, we were keen to shown Johan G-SYNC.

Following the G-SYNC demo, Johan simply said, “Our games have never looked or played better,” adding, “G-SYNC just blew me away!”

Read more about it on GeForce.com

 

Gamestream

NVIDIA GameStream, due to launch on October 28th, is NVIDIA’s advanced streaming technology, combining the high performance of GeForce GTX graphics cards with advanced Wi-Fi technologies to deliver super smooth, low latency gaming on the go. It effectively puts the ultimate GeForce GTX gaming experience in the palm of your hands. With support for over 50 top PC games, including upcoming 2013 blockbuster releases Batman: Arkham Origins and Assassin's Creed IV Black Flag, there is plenty of gaming to be had. Initially, NVIDIA GameStream will be available for local PC Streaming, however, longer-term it will also support NVIDIA GRID cloud gaming services.

Also announced is “SHIELD Console Mode”, which effectively transforms your portable SHIELD into a full gaming and entertainment console for your big-screen TV. Simply attach SHIELD to your HDTV via HDMI, pair it with a Pro Bluetooth game controller, and sit back on your couch and play your PC games with GameStream.

In addition to streaming PC games, Console Mode enables gamers to play Android games, browse the web, and watch their favorite movies at native 1080p on the big screen.

Read more about it on GeForce.com

 

Shadowplay

Fast, free and easy-to-use, ShadowPlay is a new approach to gameplay recording, utilizing an on-board H.264 encoder built into GeForce GTX 600 and 700 Series graphics cards, and an innovative recording mode that shadows your every in-game move.

Shadow Mode follows your gameplay, saving the last ten to twenty minutes of action to a temporary buffer on your hard drive. When you pull off a particularly impressive in-game move, hit Alt + F10 to save the buffered footage to a permanent file, enabling you to capture your best exploits even after the fact.  To prevent your HDD from piling up with large video files, files are not created automatically; ShadowPlay saves a clip only when you press the hotkey.

ShadowPlay leverages the H.264 hardware encoder found on GeForce GTX 600 and 700 Series graphics cards to record 1920x1080, 60 frames per second. All DirectX 9 and newer games are supported. In comparison to software solutions that hammer the CPU, ShadowPlay’s hardware solution has an approximate 5-10% performance impact when using the max-quality 50 mbps recording mode, and by saving to automatically-encoded and compressed H.264 .mp4 files, ShadowPlay avoids the disk-thrashing, humongous, multi-gigabyte files associated with other gameplay recording applications.

Read more about it on GeForce.com