by John McDonald, posted Jan 31 2013

Alpha Blending is a small--but important--part of virtually every 3D application. Conceptually, alpha-blending is used to communicate the transparency of a surface. Generally, consumer applications (games) tend to use RGB to communicate the color of the underlying surface, relying on the alpha channel to indicate the "opaquness" of that color. More specifically, when alpha blending is enabled in the pipeline, developers tend to use this form for their blending: DestinationColor.rgb...

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Tags Game & Graphics Development

by Bryan Dudash, posted Dec 19 2012

  Direct3D 11 (and the hardware that supports it) includes a lot of new functionality for programmers, but one of the most interesting and powerful additions is Tessellation. This feature has been used in numerous high profile titles and is a great way to upgrade your visuals without an unreasonable amount of extra content effort. Arguably the easiest way to leverage GPU-based tessellation is computing dynamic LODs for your geometry on the fly. For the most part this is pretty...

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Tags Game & Graphics Development

by Mark Kilgard, posted Jul 25 2011

Conventional OpenGL supports rendering images (pixel rectangles and bitmaps) and simple geometric primitives (points, lines, polygons). NVIDIA's NV_path_rendering OpenGL extension adds a new rendering paradigm, known as path rendering, for rendering filled and stroked paths. Path rendering approach is not novel-but rather a standard part of most resolution-independent 2D rendering systems such as Adobe’s PostScript, PDF, and Flash; Microsoft’s TrueType fonts, Direct2D, Office drawings,...

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Tags Game & Graphics Development

by Nathan Hoobler, posted Jul 20 2011

These older DX11 samples are still available for download here although we suggest you check out the new NVIDIA GameWorks Samples instead Tessellation   The first major DirectX 11 feature that the SDK covers is hardware-accellerated tessellation. For those not familiar, DirectX 11 adds several stages to the geometry pipeline, which allow new classes of shaders to determine if and how each polygon produced by the Vertex Shader should be subdivided; the GPU generates the desired mesh...

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Tags Game & Graphics Development

by David Coombes, posted Jun 23 2011

by Simon Green, Richard Tonge, Miguel Sainz, Dane Johnston, and David Schoemehl Note: This is a technical article that complements our consumer-oriented article on GeForce.com, "Alice: Madness Returns PhysX Comparison." A PDF version of the article can be found here.

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